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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Panda 4.1: The Devil Is in the Aggregate

he author's posts are entirely his or her own (excluding the unlikely event of hypnosis) and may not always reflect the views of Moz.
I wish I didn't have to say this. I wish I could look in the eyes of every victim of the last Panda 4.1 update and tell them it was something new, something unforeseeable, something out of their control. I wish I could tell them that Google pulled a fast one that no one saw coming. But I can't.
Like many in the industry, I have been studying Panda closely since its inception. Google gave us a rare glimpse behind the curtain by providing us with the very guidelines they set in place to build their massive machine-learned algorithm which came to be known as Panda. Three and a half years later, Panda is still with us and seems to still catch us off guard. Enough is enough.
What I intend to show you throughout this piece is that the original Panda questionnaire still remains a powerful predictive tool to wield in defense of what can be a painful organic traffic loss. By analyzing the winner/loser reports of Panda 4.1 using standard Panda surveys, we can determine whether Google's choices are still in line with their original vision. So let's dive in.

The process

The first thing we need to do is acquire a winners and losers list. I picked this excellent one from SearchMetrics although any list would do as long as it is accurate. Second, I proceeded to run a Panda questionnaire with 10 questions on random pages from each of the sites (both the winners and losers). You can run your own Panda survey by following Distilled and Moz's instructions here or just use PandaRisk like I did. After completing these analyses, we simply compare the scores across the board to determine whether they continue to reflect what we would expect given the original goals of the Panda algorithm.

The aggregate results

I actually want to do this a little bit backwards to drive home a point. Normally we would build to the aggregate results, starting with the details and leaving you with the big picture. But Panda is a big-picture kind of algorithmic update. It is specially focused on the intersection of myriad features, the sum is greater than the parts. While breaking down these features can give us some insight, at the end of the day we need to stay acutely aware that unless we do well across the board, we are at risk.
Below is a graph of the average cumulative scores across the winners and losers. The top row are winners, the bottom row are losers. The left and right red circles indicate the lowest and highest scores within those categories, and the blue circle represents the average. There is something very important that I want to point out on this graph. The highest individual average score of all the losers is less than the lowest average score of the winners. This means that in our randomly selected data set, not a single loser averaged as high a score as the worst winner. When we aggregate the data together, even with a crude system of averages rather than the far more sophisticated machine learning techniques employed by Google, there is a clear disparity between the sites that survive Panda and those that do not.

It is also worth pointing out here that there is no positive Panda algorithm to our knowledge. Sites that perform well on Panda do not see boosts because they are being given ranking preference by Google, rather their competitors have seen rankings loss or their own previous Panda penalties have been lifted. In either scenario, we should remember that performing well on Panda assessments isn't going to necessarily increase your rankings, but it should help you sustain them.
Now, let's move on to some of the individual questions. We are going to start with the least correlated questions and move to those which most strongly correlate with performance in Panda 4.1. While all of the questions had positive correlations, a few lacked statistical significance.

Insignificant correlation

The first question which was not statistically significant in its correlation with Panda performance was "This page has visible errors on it". The scores have been inverted here so that the higher the score, the fewer the number of people who reported that the page has errors. You can see that while more respondents did say that the winners had no visible errors, the difference was very slight. In fact, there was only a 5.35% difference between the two. I will save comment on this until after we discuss the next question.
The second question which was not statistically significant in its correlation with Panda performance was "This page has too many ads". The scores have once again been inverted here so that the higher the score, the fewer the number of people who reported that the page has too many ads. This was even closer. The winners performed only 2.3% better than the losers in Panda 4.1.
I think there is a clear takeaway from these two questions. Nearly everyone gets the easy stuff right, but that isn't enough. First, a lot of pages just have no ads whatsoever because that isn't their business model. Even those that do have ads have caught on for the most part and optimized their pages accordingly, especially given that Google has other layout algorithms in place aside from Panda. Moreover, content inaccuracy is more likely to impact scrapers and content spinners than most sites, so it is unsurprising that few if any reported that the pages were filled with errors. If you score poorly on either of these, you have only begun to scratch the surface, because most websites get these right enough.

Moderate correlation

A number of Panda questions drew statistically significant difference in means but there was still substantial crossover between the winners and losers. Whenever the average of the losers was greater than the lowest of the winners, I considered it only a moderate correlation. While the difference between means remained strong, there was still a good deal of variance in the scores.
The first of these to consider was the question as to whether the content was "trustworthy". You will notice a trend in a lot of these questions that there is a great deal of subjective human opinion. This subjectivity plays itself out quite a bit when the topics of the site might deal with very different categories of knowledge. For example, a celebrity fact site might be very trustworthy (although the site might be ad-laden) and an opinion piece in the New Yorker on the same celebrity might not be seen as trustworthy - even though it is plainly labeled as opinion. The trustworthy question ties back to the "does this page have errors" question quite nicely, drawing attention to the difference between a subjective and objective question and the way it can spread the means out nicely when you ask a respondent to give more of a personal opinion. This might seem unfair, but in the real world your site and Google itself is being judged by that subjective opinion, so it is understandable why Google wants to get at it algorithmically. Nevertheless, there was a strong difference in means between winners and losers of 12.57%, more than double the difference we saw between winners and losers on the question of Errors.

Original content has long been a known requirement of organic search success, so no one was surprised when it made its way into the Panda questionnaire. It still remains an influential piece of the puzzle with a difference in mean of nearly 20%. It was barely ruled out from being a heavily correlated feature due to one loser edging out a loss against the losers' average mean. Notice though that one of the winners scored a perfect 100% on the survey. This perfect score was received despite hundreds of respondents. It can be done.

As you can imagine, perception on what is and is not an authority is very subjective. This question is powerful because it pulls in all kinds of assumptions and presuppositions about brand, subject matter, content quality, design, justification, citations, etc. This likely explains why this question is beleaguered by one of the highest variances on the survey. Nevertheless, there was a 13.42% difference in means. And, on the other side of the scale, we did see what it is like to have a site that is clearly not an authority, scoring the worst possible 0% on this question. This is what happens when you include highly irrelevant content on your site just for the purpose of picking up either links or traffic. Be wary.

Everyone hates the credit card question, and luckily there is huge variance in answers. At least one site survived Panda despite scoring 5% on this question. Notice that there is a huge overlap between the lowest winner and the average of the losing sites. Also, if you notice by the placement of the mean (blue circle) in the winners category, the average wasn't skewed to the right indicating just one outlier. There was strong variance in the responses across the board. The same was true of the losers. However, with a +15% difference in means, there was a clear average differentiation between the performance of winners and losers. Once again, though, we are drawn back to that aggregate score at the top, where we see how Google can use all these questions together to build a much clearer picture of site and content quality. For example, it is possible that Google pays more attention to this question when it is analyzing a site that has other features like the words "shopping cart" or "check out" on the homepage.

I must admit that the bookmarking question surprised me. I always considered it to be the most subjective of the bunch. It seemed unfair that a site might be judged because it has material that simply doesn't appeal to the masses. The survey just didn't bear this out though. There was a clear difference in means, but after comparing the sites that were from similar content categories, there just wasn't any reason to believe that a bias was created by subject matter. The 14.64% difference seemed to be, editorially speaking, related more to the construction of the page and the quality of the content, not the topic being discussed. Perhaps a better way to think about this question is: would you be embarrassed if your friends knew THIS was the site you were getting your information from rather than another.

This wraps up the 5 questions that had good correlations but substantial enough variance that it was possible for the highest loser to beat out the average winner. I think one clear takeaway from this section is that these questions, while harder to improve upon than the Low Ads and No Errors questions before, are completely within the webmaster's grasp. Making your content and site appear original, trustworthy, authoritative, and worthy of bookmarking aren't terribly difficult. Sure, it takes some time and effort, but these goals, unlike the next, don't appear that far out of reach.

Heavy correlation

The final three questions that seemed to distinguish the most between the winners and losers of Panda 4.1 all had high difference-in-means and, more importantly, had little to no crossover between the highest loser and lowest winner. In my opinion, these questions are also the hardest for the webmaster to address. They require thoughtful design, high quality content, and real, expert human authors.
The first question that met this classification was "could this content could appear in print". With a difference in mean of 22.62%, the winners thoroughly trounced the losers in this category. Their sites and content were just better designed and better written. They showed the kind of editorial oversight you would expect in a print publication. The content wasn't trite and unimportant, it was thorough and timely.

The next heavily correlated question was whether the page was written by experts. With over a 34% difference in means between the winners and losers, and literally no overlap at all between the winners' and losers' individual averages, it was clearly the strongest question. You can see why Google would want to look into things like authorship when they knew that expertise was such a powerful distinguisher between Panda winners and losers. This really begs the question - who is writing your content and do your readers know it?

Finally, insightful analysis had a huge difference in means of +32% between winners and losers. It is worth noting that the highest loser is an outlier, which is typified by the skewed mean (blue circle) being closer to the bottom that the top. Most of the answers were closer to the lower score than the top. Thus, the overlap is exaggerated a bit. But once again, this just draws us back to the original conclusion - that the devil is not in the details, the devil is in the aggregate. You might be able to score highly on one or two of the questions, but it won't be enough to carry you through.


The takeaways

OK, so hopefully it is clear that Panda really hasn't changed all that much. The same questions we looked at for Panda 1.0 still matter. In fact, I would argue that Google is just getting better at algorithmically answering those same questions, not changing them. They are still the right way to judge a site in Google's eyes. So how should you respond?
The first and most obvious thing is you should run a Panda survey on your (or your clients') sites. Select a random sample of pages from the site. The easiest way to do this is get an export of all of the pages of your site, perhaps from Open Site Explorer, put them in Excel and shuffle them. Then choose the top 10 that come up.  You can follow the Moz instructions I linked to above, do it at PandaRisk, or just survey your employees, friends, colleagues, etc. While the latter probably will be positively biased, it is still better than nothing. Go ahead and get yourself a benchmark.
The next step is to start pushing those scores up one at a time. I give some solid examples on the Panda 4.0 release article about improving press release sites, but there is another better resource that just came out as well. Josh Bachynski released an amazing set of known Panda factors over at his website The Moral Concept. It is well worth a thorough read. There is a lot to take in, but there are tons of easy-to-implement improvements that could help you out quite a bit. Once you have knocked out a few for each of your low-scoring questions, run the exact same survey again and see how you improve. Keep iterating this process until you beat out each of the question averages for winners. At that point, you can rest assured that your site is safe from the Panda by beating the devil in the aggregate.


Read More: Panda 4.1: The Devil Is in the Aggregate

Latest Seo News Updates 2014-Basic Seo Interview Questions and Answers for freshers

This post contains some basic SEO interview questions and answers for freshers. Learn all these questions and answers.


What is SEO?

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of changing the position of a website or a web page in a search engine's search results (Organic or Natural results).

Types of SEO

Two Types of SEO are
  • On Page Optimization
  • Off Page Optimization

SEO Techniques:

Two SEO Techniques are
  • White Hat SEO
  • Black Hat SEO ( Negative SEO )

What is On Page Optimization?

On-page optimization is one of the types of SEO that refers to factor that gives outcome to a website or web page ranking on SERP ( Search Engine Results Page ). On-Page Optimization means controlling a webpage by you or by your page coding.
Some of the examples are HTML Code, Meta Tags like Meta Title, Description, Content Quality, Keyword Density, Outbound Links, Image Alt tag etc.

What is Off Page Optimization?

Off Page Optimization is also one of the types of SEO that are not controlled by the page coding.
Examples of Off-page optimization Link building, Blog posting, Image Sharing, Document Sharing, Video Sharing, Info graphics submission, Increasing Page Rank and Page Authority, Article submission, Getting high quality links from relevant sites etc.

What is Page Rank or PR?

Page Rank is a rank that has been provided by Google for each and every Webpage. This Rank ranges from 0 to 10. This Page Rank is calculated by an Algorithm used by Google Web Search Engine. PR of a web page is based on the number of backlinks that received from other high PR webpage.

What is a Backlink?

Backlink means incoming links to a website or webpage. Inbound links are always better than outbound links. Those links are also known as incoming links, inlinks, inward links etc. Getting backlinks from high PR and relevant site is always good. Inlinks from .org, .edu sites would increase your website or webpage ranking on SERP. Do-follow links are better than No-follow links.
 

What are out bound Links?

An outbound-link (OBL) or outgoing link is a link from your website or webpage to another website or webpage.

What is a keyword?

Keyword is a word that is used for searching through Search Engines in order to get results related to your searched query.

What is Keyword Density?

Keyword density is the percentage density of a keyword or phrase available on a webpage compared to the total number of words on the page. It is one of the important ranking factors for search engines to display a webpage on the SERP. Providing junk keywords on a page would decrease the ranking of a webpage.

What is Anchor Text?

Anchor text is a clickable hyperlink that is also known as link text, link label and link title. The keyword contained in the anchor text would increase the ranking of a webpage that receives the incoming link.

What are organic results?

The page views come directly through SERP and not through any Off Page Optimization is known as organic results.

What is Googlebot?

Googlebot is the search bot software used by Google to index a webpage. Crawling, Caching and indexing of a webpage happen through this Googlebot by collecting details from that webpage.

What are Meta Tags?

There are several Meta tags used in HTML but the top four tags that are used for SEO are Meta Title, Meta Description, Meta Keywords and Robot tags.

What is Meta Title?

Title is the most important factors for a good SEO of a webpage. These tags should be located within head section. These tags should tell some useful information about that page. A good title tag should contain 60 characters. These titles would appear on the SERP for your website along with the Meta description of that page. Google won't penalize your page if it contains title with more than 60 characters and it skips the remaining characters. If a web page doesn't contain title tag means Google would select the H1 tag as title or it will provide the title by its own.
Always write title tag for the page and not for SEO, if you stuff keywords in you title then Google won't rank your webpage.

What is Meta Description?

A description tag should describe a webpage and it should contain keywords but don't stuff all the keywords. Meaningless description would affect your webpage. A description tag should contain 150 – 160 characters. If you provide meaningless or empty description, Google would take the description from the content available in that page.

What are Meta Keywords?

In early days Meta keywords are the least important tag for Search engine like Google. But it is an easy way to tell our important keywords to search engine. Meta keywords should contain less than 250 characters.
Now Google won't consider Meta keywords as one of the ranking factor.

What is White Hat Seo?

White Hat SEO is one of the SEO techniques that a Search engine always likes. Usage of SEO techniques, tricks and tactics by following search engine rules and regulations, algorithm and policies are known as White Hat SEO.

What is Black Hat Seo?

Black Hat SEO or Negative SEO is a common term for doing SEO Spamming Techniques. Usage of SEO by not following policies and regulations of search engine is called as black hat seo. Some of the black hat seo techniques are
  • Providing Low Quality content or duplicate content on the page
  • Getting backlinks from spammed or adult sites.
  • Giving keyword stuffed content on the page with background color
  • Getting too much backlinks from a single page with different anchor text that targets a single page of your website.
  • Cloaking
  • Google Bowling etc
 

Monday, May 27, 2013

Top 25 Common Interview Questions and Their Answers for any Type of Job

To get a job you have to first clear an Interview. If you want to clear an interview then you need to prepare for it beforehand.

In an interview they will ask different types of questions according to the job you are applying for.

 

Top 25 Common Interview Questions and Answers

Some questions are basic that is common for any interview and some of them are very technical based upon the particular job.

In this article, I will tell you top 25 interviews questions and their answers which are very common and can be asked for any type of job. 

It really does not matter the type of job you are applying for because following 25 questions and answers are very common & non technical that you are going to be asked. 

Note: If you are really wanted to know about these 25 question please follow of these link which I have mentioned below:

Monday, October 29, 2012

List of HTTP Header Status Code Definitions

HTTP Header Status Code Definitions 200, 301, 302, 304, 400, 404, 500, 503



Each Status-Code is described below, including a description of which method(s) it can follow and any meta information required in the response.

INFORMATIONAL

This class of status code indicates a provisional response, consisting only of the Status-Line and optional headers, and is terminated by an empty line. There are no required headers for this class of status code. Since HTTP/1.0 did not define any 1xx status codes, servers MUST NOT send a 1xx response to an HTTP/1.0 client except under experimental conditions.

A client MUST be prepared to accept one or more 1xx status responses prior to a regular response, even if the client does not expect a 100 (Continue) status message. Unexpected 1xx status responses MAY be ignored by a user agent.

Proxies MUST forward 1xx responses, unless the connection between the proxy and its client has been closed, or unless the proxy itself requested the generation of the 1xx response. (For example, if a

proxy adds a "Expect: 100-continue" field when it forwards a request, then it need not forward the corresponding 100 (Continue) response(s).)

100 Continue

The client SHOULD continue with its request. This interim response is used to inform the client that the initial part of the request has been received and has not yet been rejected by the server. The client SHOULD continue by sending the remainder of the request or, if the request has already been completed, ignore this response. The server MUST send a final response after the request has been completed. See section 8.2.3 for detailed discussion of the use and handling of this status code.

101 Switching Protocols

The server understands and is willing to comply with the client's request, via the Upgrade message header field (section 14.42), for a change in the application protocol being used on this connection. The server will switch protocols to those defined by the response's Upgrade header field immediately after the empty line which terminates the 101 response.

The protocol SHOULD be switched only when it is advantageous to do so. For example, switching to a newer version of HTTP is advantageous over older versions, and switching to a real-time, synchronous protocol might be advantageous when delivering resources that use such features.

SUCCESSFUL

This class of status code indicates that the client's request was successfully received, understood, and accepted.

200 OK

The request has succeeded. The information returned with the response is dependent on the method used in the request, for example:

GET an entity corresponding to the requested resource is sent in the response;

HEAD the entity-header fields corresponding to the requested resource are sent in the response without any message-body;

POST an entity describing or containing the result of the action;

TRACE an entity containing the request message as received by the end server.

201 Created

The request has been fulfilled and resulted in a new resource being created. The newly created resource can be referenced by the URI(s) returned in the entity of the response, with the most specific URI for the resource given by a Location header field. The response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of resource characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content-Type header field. The origin server MUST create the resource before returning the 201 status code. If the action cannot be carried out immediately, the server SHOULD respond with 202 (Accepted) response instead.

A 201 response MAY contain an ETag response header field indicating the current value of the entity tag for the requested variant just created, see section 14.19.

202 Accepted

The request has been accepted for processing, but the processing has not been completed. The request might or might not eventually be acted upon, as it might be disallowed when processing actually takes place. There is no facility for re-sending a status code from an asynchronous operation such as this.

The 202 response is intentionally non-committal. Its purpose is to allow a server to accept a request for some other process (perhaps a batch-oriented process that is only run once per day) without requiring that the user agent's connection to the server persist until the process is completed. The entity returned with this response SHOULD include an indication of the request's current status and either a pointer to a status monitor or some estimate of when the user can expect the request to be fulfilled.

203 Non-Authoritative Information

The returned meta information in the entity-header is not the definitive set as available from the origin server, but is gathered from a local or a third-party copy. The set presented MAY be a subset or super set of the original version. For example, including local annotation information about the resource might result in a super set of the meta information known by the origin server. Use of this response code is not required and is only appropriate when the response would otherwise be 200 (OK).

204 No Content
The server has fulfilled the request but does not need to return an entity-body, and might want to return updated meta information. The response MAY include new or updated meta information in the form of entity-headers, which if present SHOULD be associated with the requested variant.

If the client is a user agent, it SHOULD NOT change its document view from that which caused the request to be sent. This response is primarily intended to allow input for actions to take place without causing a change to the user agent's active document view, although any new or updated meta information SHOULD be applied to the document currently in the user agent's active view.

The 204 response MUST NOT include a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

205 Reset Content

The server has fulfilled the request and the user agent SHOULD reset the document view which caused the request to be sent. This response is primarily intended to allow input for actions to take place via user input, followed by a clearing of the form in which the input is given so that the user can easily initiate another input action. The response MUST NOT include an entity.

206 Partial Content

The server has fulfilled the partial GET request for the resource. The request MUST have included a Range header field (section 14.35) indicating the desired range, and MAY have included an If-Range header field (section 14.27) to make the request conditional.

The response MUST include the following header fields:

      - Either a Content-Range header field (section 14.16) indicating
        the range included with this response, or a multiparty/byte ranges
        Content-Type including Content-Range fields for each part. If a
        Content-Length header field is present in the response, its
        value MUST match the actual number of OCTETs transmitted in the
        message-body.

      - Date

      - E Tag and/or Content-Location, if the header would have been sent
        in a 200 response to the same request

      - Expires, Cache-Control, and/or Vary, if the field-value might
        differ from that sent in any previous response for the same
        variant

If the 206 response is the result of an If-Range request that used a strong cache validator (see section 13.3.3), the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. If the response is the result of an If-Range request that used a weak validator, the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers. Otherwise, the response MUST include all of the entity-headers that would have been returned with a 200 (OK) response to the same request.

A cache MUST NOT combine a 206 response with other previously cached content if the ETag or Last-Modified headers do not match exactly, see 13.5.4.

A cache that does not support the Range and Content-Range headers MUST NOT cache 206 (Partial) responses.

REDIRECTION

This class of status code indicates that further action needs to be taken by the user agent in order to fulfill the request. The action required MAY be carried out by the user agent without interaction with the user if and only if the method used in the second request is GET or HEAD. A client SHOULD detect infinite redirection loops, since such loops generate network traffic for each redirection.

      Note: previous versions of this specification recommended a
      maximum of five redirections. Content developers should be aware
      that there might be clients that implement such a fixed
      limitation.

300 Multiple Choices

The requested resource corresponds to any one of a set of representations, each with its own specific location, and agent- driven negotiation information (section 12) is being provided so that the user (or user agent) can select a preferred representation and redirect its request to that location.

Unless it was a HEAD request, the response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of resource characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content- Type header field. Depending upon the format and the capabilities of

the user agent, selection of the most appropriate choice MAY be performed automatically. However, this specification does not define any standard for such automatic selection.

If the server has a preferred choice of representation, it SHOULD include the specific URI for that representation in the Location field; user agents MAY use the Location field value for automatic redirection. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.

301 Moved Permanently
The requested resource has been assigned a new permanent URI and any future references to this resource SHOULD use one of the returned URIs. Clients with link editing capabilities ought to automatically re-link references to the Request-URI to one or more of the new references returned by the server, where possible. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.

The new permanent URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).

If the 301 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.

      Note: When automatically redirecting a POST request after
      receiving a 301 status code, some existing HTTP/1.0 user agents
      will erroneously change it into a GET request.

302 Found

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.

The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).

If the 302 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.

      Note: RFC 1945 and RFC 2068 specify that the client is not allowed
      to change the method on the redirected request.  However, most
      existing user agent implementations treat 302 as if it were a 303
      response, performing a GET on the Location field-value regardless
      of the original request method. The status codes 303 and 307 have
      been added for servers that wish to make unambiguously clear which
      kind of reaction is expected of the client.

303 See Other

The response to the request can be found under a different URI and SHOULD be retrieved using a GET method on that resource. This method exists primarily to allow the output of a POST-activated script to redirect the user agent to a selected resource. The new URI is not a substitute reference for the originally requested resource. The 303 response MUST NOT be cached, but the response to the second (redirected) request might be cacheable.

The different URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).

      Note: Many pre-HTTP/1.1 user agents do not understand the 303
      status. When interoperability with such clients is a concern, the
      302 status code may be used instead, since most user agents react
      to a 302 response as described here for 303.

304 Not Modified

If the client has performed a conditional GET request and access is allowed, but the document has not been modified, the server SHOULD respond with this status code. The 304 response MUST NOT contain a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

The response MUST include the following header fields:

      - Date, unless its omission is required by section 14.18.1

If a clockless origin server obeys these rules, and proxies and clients add their own Date to any response received without one (as already specified by [RFC 2068], section 14.19), caches will operate correctly.

      - ETag and/or Content-Location, if the header would have been sent
        in a 200 response to the same request

      - Expires, Cache-Control, and/or Vary, if the field-value might
        differ from that sent in any previous response for the same
        variant

If the conditional GET used a strong cache validator (see section 13.3.3), the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. Otherwise (i.e., the conditional GET used a weak validator), the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers.

If a 304 response indicates an entity not currently cached, then the cache MUST disregard the response and repeat the request without the conditional.

If a cache uses a received 304 response to update a cache entry, the cache MUST update the entry to reflect any new field values given in the response.

305 Use Proxy

The requested resource MUST be accessed through the proxy given by the Location field. The Location field gives the URI of the proxy. The recipient is expected to repeat this single request via the proxy. 305 responses MUST only be generated by origin servers.

      Note: RFC 2068 was not clear that 305 was intended to redirect a
      single request, and to be generated by origin servers only.  Not
      observing these limitations has significant security consequences.

306 (Unused)

The 306 status code was used in a previous version of the specification, is no longer used, and the code is reserved.

307 Temporary Redirect

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection MAY be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.

The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s) , since many pre-HTTP/1.1 user agents do not understand the 307 status. Therefore, the note SHOULD contain the information necessary for a user to repeat the original request on the new URI.

If the 307 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.

CLIENT ERROR

The 4xx class of status code is intended for cases in which the client seems to have erred. Except when responding to a HEAD request, the server SHOULD include an entity containing an explanation of the error situation, and whether it is a temporary or permanent condition. These status codes are applicable to any request method. User agents SHOULD display any included entity to the user.

If the client is sending data, a server implementation using TCP SHOULD be careful to ensure that the client acknowledges receipt of the packet(s) containing the response, before the server closes the input connection. If the client continues sending data to the server after the close, the server's TCP stack will send a reset packet to the client, which may erase the client's unacknowledged input buffers before they can be read and interpreted by the HTTP application.

400 Bad Request

The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.

401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication. The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field (section 14.47) containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Authorization header field (section 14.8). If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. If the 401 response contains the same challenge as the prior response, and the user agent has already attempted authentication at least once, then the user SHOULD be presented the entity that was given in the response, since that entity might include relevant diagnostic information. HTTP access authentication is explained in "HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication" [43].

402 Payment Required

This code is reserved for future use.

403 Forbidden
The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead.

404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or when no other response is applicable.

405 Method Not Allowed

The method specified in the Request-Line is not allowed for the resource identified by the Request-URI. The response MUST include an Allow header containing a list of valid methods for the requested resource.

406 Not Acceptable

The resource identified by the request is only capable of generating response entities which have content characteristics not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the request.

Unless it was a HEAD request, the response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of available entity characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content-Type header field. Depending upon the format and the capabilities of the user agent, selection of the most appropriate choice MAY be performed automatically. However, this specification does not define any standard for such automatic selection.

      Note: HTTP/1.1 servers are allowed to return responses which are
      not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the
      request. In some cases, this may even be preferable to sending a
      406 response. User agents are encouraged to inspect the headers of
      an incoming response to determine if it is acceptable.

If the response could be unacceptable, a user agent SHOULD temporarily stop receipt of more data and query the user for a decision on further actions.

407 Proxy Authentication Required

This code is similar to 401 (Unauthorized), but indicates that the client must first authenticate itself with the proxy. The proxy MUST return a Proxy-Authenticate header field (section 14.33) containing a challenge applicable to the proxy for the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Proxy-Authorization header field (section 14.34). HTTP access authentication is explained in "HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication" [43].

408 Request Timeout
The client did not produce a request within the time that the server was prepared to wait. The client MAY repeat the request without modifications at any later time.

409 Conflict

The request could not be completed due to a conflict with the current state of the resource. This code is only allowed in situations where it is expected that the user might be able to resolve the conflict and resubmit the request. The response body SHOULD include enough

information for the user to recognize the source of the conflict. Ideally, the response entity would include enough information for the user or user agent to fix the problem; however, that might not be possible and is not required.

Conflicts are most likely to occur in response to a PUT request. For example, if versioning were being used and the entity being PUT included changes to a resource which conflict with those made by an earlier (third-party) request, the server might use the 409 response to indicate that it can't complete the request. In this case, the response entity would likely contain a list of the differences between the two versions in a format defined by the response Content-Type.

410 Gone

The requested resource is no longer available at the server and no forwarding address is known. This condition is expected to be considered permanent. Clients with link editing capabilities SHOULD delete references to the Request-URI after user approval. If the server does not know, or has no facility to determine, whether or not the condition is permanent, the status code 404 (Not Found) SHOULD be used instead. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.

The 410 response is primarily intended to assist the task of web maintenance by notifying the recipient that the resource is intentionally unavailable and that the server owners desire that remote links to that resource be removed. Such an event is common for limited-time, promotional services and for resources belonging to individuals no longer working at the server's site. It is not necessary to mark all permanently unavailable resources as "gone" or to keep the mark for any length of time -- that is left to the discretion of the server owner.

411 Length Required

The server refuses to accept the request without a defined Content- Length. The client MAY repeat the request if it adds a valid Content-Length header field containing the length of the message-body in the request message.

412 Precondition Failed

The precondition given in one or more of the request-header fields evaluated to false when it was tested on the server. This response code allows the client to place preconditions on the current resource metainformation (header field data) and thus prevent the requested method from being applied to a resource other than the one intended.

413 Request Entity Too Large

The server is refusing to process a request because the request entity is larger than the server is willing or able to process. The server MAY close the connection to prevent the client from continuing the request.

If the condition is temporary, the server SHOULD include a Retry- After header field to indicate that it is temporary and after what time the client MAY try again.

414 Request-URI Too Long

The server is refusing to service the request because the Request-URI is longer than the server is willing to interpret. This rare condition is only likely to occur when a client has improperly converted a POST request to a GET request with long query information, when the client has descended into a URI "black hole" of redirection (e.g., a redirected URI prefix that points to a suffix of itself), or when the server is under attack by a client attempting to exploit security holes present in some servers using fixed-length buffers for reading or manipulating the Request-URI.

415 Unsupported Media Type

The server is refusing to service the request because the entity of the request is in a format not supported by the requested resource for the requested method.

416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable

A server SHOULD return a response with this status code if a request included a Range request-header field (section 14.35), and none of the range-specifier values in this field overlap the current extent of the selected resource, and the request did not include an If-Range request-header field. (For byte-ranges, this means that the first- byte-pos of all of the byte-range-spec values were greater than the current length of the selected resource.)

When this status code is returned for a byte-range request, the response SHOULD include a Content-Range entity-header field specifying the current length of the selected resource (see section 14.16). This response MUST NOT use the multipart/byteranges content- type.

417 Expectation Failed

The expectation given in an Expect request-header field (see section 14.20) could not be met by this server, or, if the server is a proxy, the server has unambiguous evidence that the request could not be met by the next-hop server.

SERVER ERROR

Response status codes beginning with the digit "5" indicate cases in which the server is aware that it has erred or is incapable of performing the request. Except when responding to a HEAD request, the server SHOULD include an entity containing an explanation of the error situation, and whether it is a temporary or permanent condition. User agents SHOULD display any included entity to the user. These response codes are applicable to any request method.

500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition which prevented it from fulfilling the request.

501 Not Implemented

The server does not support the functionality required to fulfill the request. This is the appropriate response when the server does not recognize the request method and is not capable of supporting it for any resource.

502 Bad Gateway

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, received an invalid response from the upstream server it accessed in attempting to fulfill the request.

503 Service Unavailable

The server is currently unable to handle the request due to a temporary overloading or maintenance of the server. The implication is that this is a temporary condition which will be alleviated after some delay. If known, the length of the delay MAY be indicated in a Retry-After header. If no Retry-After is given, the client SHOULD handle the response as it would for a 500 response.

      Note: The existence of the 503 status code does not imply that a
      server must use it when becoming overloaded. Some servers may wish
      to simply refuse the connection.

504 Gateway Timeout

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, did not receive a timely response from the upstream server specified by the URI (e.g. HTTP, FTP, LDAP) or some other auxiliary server (e.g. DNS) it needed to access in attempting to complete the request.

      Note: Note to implementors: some deployed proxies are known to
      return 400 or 500 when DNS lookups time out.

505 HTTP Version Not Supported

The server does not support, or refuses to support, the HTTP protocol version that was used in the request message. The server is indicating that it is unable or unwilling to complete the request using the same major version as the client, as described in section 3.1, other than with this error message. The response SHOULD contain an entity describing why that version is not supported and what other protocols are supported by that server.

Source Code Click Here

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

SEO Interview Questions, Tips, and Answers - Video


12 Latest SEO Interview Questions and Answers

12 Latest SEO Interview Questions and Answers

here is the list of 12 more latest & frequently asked technical SEO interview questions and answers.

  1. What is the Difference Between Google Panda and Penguin Update?
    Panda Update - This update is designed to reduce rankings for low-quality sites—sites which are low-value add for users, copy content from other websites or sites that are just not very useful.
    Penguin Update - This Update was designed to remove/down the websites from index which were doing much more that white hat optimization like creating too many low quality backlinks, use of aggressive exact match anchor text, overuse of exact match domains, blog spam and low quality article marketing, keyword stuffing etc...
  2. What is topic modeling? – Topic Modeling is a technique used by search engines to clearly analyse and identify the large volume of text on a webpage. Read more about topic modeling here: http://www.tdktech.com/topic-modeling
  3. What is Pagination in SEO? – Pagination is the practice of dividing a piece of content into different pages while at the same time allowing Google to better understand the important pages to be indexed. Read the Google's advice on using the pagination.
  4. What are rich snippets? – Rich Snippets are the combination of structured data displayed in Google search results for better relevancy to the user and more data at a glance. Rich snippets are shown after google identifies any microformats (http://microformats.org/) structured tags embedded in your webpage coding, on sept 20th, 2012, Google also launched the new Rich Snippets testing tool and named it the structured data testing tool
  5. What are URL parameters? – URL parameters are the values/attributes passed in the URL of a webpage to fetch any data from the database or to alter the order/structure of data displayed on the webpage, This is an important thing to consider while doing SEO for websites which uses URL parameters, especially e-commerce sites because these many times creates the duplicacy of content, you can handle this duplicacy using the rel canonical attribute and the Google webmaster tools, read more about configuring URL parameters in Webmaster Tools.
  6. What is A/B testing and Multivariate Testing? – A/B testing is the testing of a webpage by creating its two different versions and redirecting some of the users to variation version from the original URL to know which version is more effective, multivariate testing is done using the software programs to dynamically insert/alter the components on a webpage and record the user interaction/behavior with all the combinations and identify the most effective combination. Google recommends using 302 temporary redirect while running the A/B testing in your website.
  7. How to decrease the bounce rate of a webpage? – Using strong Call to Action within the text of the webpage (Known as contextual CTA), alongside with the content, improving design of the page, adding links to the related content, increase the speed of webpage loading, designing easy and user friendly navigation and overall creating a responsive design.
  8. Why we use noodp in meta robot tag? – To block the open directory project description from displaying in the search results, applies only to websites which are listed in ODP, i.e. dmoz.org.
  9. What is meta refresh tag, should we use it? – Meta refresh tag on a webpage send the user to another url after a specified period of time, typically in seconds. It is not recommended, rather use server side 301 redirect.
  10. What are breadcrumb? – Breadcrumb is a website navigation system that clearly states the structure of website to both the users and the search engines, in case, making search engines clearly identify the structure of website, the microformats tags for breadcrumbs should be embedded in the HTML.
  11. Is there a way we can tell Google that a particular webpage contains the Adult content? – Yes, we can do it by adding one of these two meta tags to that webpage 
    1. OR
  12. How Google treat links in PDF files? – Same as in the HTML pages, these passes the page rank, indexing signals and other data, it is not possible to nofollow the links in PDF files.

Monday, October 8, 2012

30 Most Asked SEO Interview Questions & Answers

here is the list of 30 latest & frequently asked technical SEO interview questions and answers for the candidates who are willing to grab a new job in SEO field in the very first attempt.
  1. Which are the most important area to include your keywords? – Page title and Body text are the most important areas where we can include keywords for the SEO purpose.
  2. What are webmaster tools? – Webmaster tools is a free service by Google from where we can get free Indexing data, backlinks information, crawl errors, search queries, CTR, website malware errors and submit the XML sitemap.
  3. What is the best way to maximize the frequency of crawling of your website by search engines? – Frequently adding new, original and quality content on the website.
  4. Do you know who is Danny Sullivan? – He is a Journalist who covers the field of web search, considered as search engine guru and editor at searchengineland.com
  5. Who is Matt Cutts? – He is the head of web spam team at Google. Read more about Matt Cutts here: http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/
  6. What is the best criterion to identify the value of a backlink? – The authority of the domain, quality of the content on the page where the backlink is provided and then the page rank of the website.
  7. What is keyword proximity? – Keyword Proximity is a measurement criteria of the closeness of the keywords within the Page Title, Meta Description and Body Text.
  8. What is keyword prominence? – Keyword prominence is the location of the keywords in the page title, meta description and body text…..Read more about prominence at: http://www.seoglossary.com/article/64
  9. Difference between exit rate and bounce rate? – Bounce rate is the percentage of people who leaves a particular website just after visiting a single page on this and exit rate refers to the percentage of people who leaves from a particular page….read more here http://www.blindfiveyearold.com/bounce-rate-vs-exit-rate
  10. What is the Panda update and which is its current version? – Panda is a search algorithm update by the Google to take on the content farms, low quality websites and the websites getting low quality backlinks, Google removed a lot of the webpage from the higher search index during this update and the current version of Panda is 2.5.3 updated on October 19/20th Oct. 2011…read here for latest panda updates http://www.seroundtable.com/tag/panda
  11. What was caffeine update? – Caffeine update was rolled out by Google in June 2010 and the main purpose of this update was to include more fresh results in the search index, at least 50%..read more about caffeine update here http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/our-new-search-index-caffeine.html
  12. A customer can give you an access to only one tool, which one will you choose, Webmasters or Analytics? – Of Course Webmaster tools, because these are almost the essential tools for the search engine optimization, we can have some analytics data in the webmasters as well. But now due to the inclusion of webmaster data in Analytics, we would like to have access to Analytics.
  13. What is 404? – It is a server error code which is returned by the server what a particular webpage or the file is missing from the webhost server.
  14. What is 301 redirect? – It is a SEO friendly version of permanent redirect for the webpages or the domains. Read more about 301 redirect here http://www.webconfs.com/how-to-redirect-a-webpage.php
  15. What is 302 redirect? – It is a temporary redirect. Read more here http://www.internetofficer.com/seo/302-redirect/
  16. What is robots.txt? – Robots.txt is a text file used to give instructions to the search engine crawlers about the caching and indexing of a webpage, domain, directory or a file of a website. Read more here http://www.robotstxt.org/
  17. What are the other methods to restrict a webpage from the search index? – we can use noindex meta tag. Read more here http://www.robotstxt.org/meta.html
  18. What are Google Webmaster Tools crawl errors? – Crawl errors provides the information about the URL’s of your website which are not accessible but linked from somewhere. Read more here http://www.google.com/support/webmasters/bin/answer.py?answer=35120
  19. What is a landing page? – a landing page is a page in the website which is designed to attract the visitors to contact/subscribe/buy a service or the product by reading few lines of important information about that particular service or the product on that page. Read more about landing page here http://www.copyblogger.com/landing-pages/
  20. What is the recent change in Google Analytics? – Real time visitors info, visitors flow, webmaster tools SEO data and website speed data. Read more here http://analytics.blogspot.com/
  21. How to handle the duplicate page in the website? – using canonical tag. Read more here http://www.seomoz.org/blog/canonical-url-tag-the-most-important-advancement-in-seo-practices-since-sitemaps
  22. What are the types of CSS and which is better for SEO? – 3 types, Internal CSS, inline CSS and external CSS. Read more about CSS types here at http://www.expression-web-tutorial.com/Types_CSS_Styles.html. The external CSS is best for SEO purpose. Read why to use external CSS http://www.basictips.com/tips/article_64.shtml
  23. How many heading tags are there in HTML? – 6 tags, from H1 to H6
  24. Can we use more than one H1 on a single webpage? – Of course, if there is a need of describing two related topics on the same page then we can use, but using more than 2 or 3 will not provide any credit to the search engines.  Matt Cutts advise on using more than one H1 tag http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIn5qJKU8VM
  25. Italic or Bold, which is more useful? – Both are almost same but Italic have a slight more better for keyword targeting on the webpage. Read more here http://www.seomoz.org/blog/perfecting-keyword-targeting-on-page-optimization
  26. What are top SEO ranking factors? – Quality of content on the webpage, quality and quantity of backlinks to the webpage, anchor text used in the backlinks, domain authority, social sharing metrics and some other traffic metrics like page CTR, bounce rate and average time on the webpage. Read more here http://www.seomoz.org/article/search-ranking-factors and here http://www.searchengineoptimizationjournal.com/2010/01/14/google-ranking-factors/
  27. What is the criteria for removing a webpage from Google search index? – It should return a 404 not found error or it should be 301 permanently redirected.
  28. Some basic and quick steps to increase the webpage speed. – removing the unused code and scripts. Replacing internal and inline CSS with the external CSS. Using web server’s page compression methods. Using small sized images or minimizing the no. of images.
  29. What is CTR? – It is Click Through Rate. Read more about CTR here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clickthrough_rate
  30. What is CTA? – It is Call to Action. Read more here  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_to_action_(marketing) 
Article Source http://mozseo.blogspot.com/2011/12/30-most-asked-seo-interview-questions.html

Monday, September 24, 2012

Google Webmaster Quiz – Questions and Answers

Quite sometime before The Google Webmaster Central announced a “fun and educational” quiz for all the webmasters to take over, as a refresher course here is the list of questions and their answers. Have fun learning and solving !!!

Google Webmaster Quiz – Questions and Answers

Below are the list of Webmaster Questions!!


Q1. You have moved your site to a new domain name. For users and search engines, the preferred way to permanently redirect traffic is:
Ans) 301 redirect

Q2. Your server is going to be moved and unavailable for a day. What should you do?
Ans) Return “Network Unavailable (503)” with a helpful message to all requests

Q3. Your website is not in the index 5 days after you’ve put it online; what should you do?
Ans) Continue working on the site

Q4. Your homepage has 287 errors in the W3C validator. What is the maximum number of URLs that Google could index from your site?
Ans) All

Q5. You bought multiple domain names and want them to all show the same website. What should you do with them?
Ans) Use a 301 redirect

Q6. 192 PDF files from your /private-files/ folder have gotten indexed and you need to remove them from Google’s search results. What’s the fastest way to do this?
Ans) Disallow the folder in robots.txt and request removal of the whole folder in Webmaster Tools

Q7. You need to prevent Google from indexing any content in the new folder /private-files/. What’s the best way to do this?
Ans) Use server-side authentication (username/password) for this folder

Q8. Your site changed all URLs from .php to .asp, what do you need to do?
Ans) 301 redirect the old URLs to the new ones

Q9. You have a country-coded domain name called example.es. To associate your site with Spain, you need to:
Ans) None of this is necessary. Google should already associate a domain ending in .es with Spain.

Q10. You have some pages completely in Spanish and others completely in English. How would you tell Google about this?
Ans) No need to do anything. Google should figure it out.

Q11. Which of the following is NOT against Google’s Webmaster Guidelines?
Ans) Running tests on a site that result in some users seeing one version of a page and other users seeing another version

Q12. All of the following can be link schemes that can negatively impact your site’s ranking in search results EXCEPT:
Ans) Links to other sites that you think your users will find interesting or useful

Q13. What does it mean when a robots.txt file contains “User-agent: *” and “Disallow:”?
Ans) Allow all search engines to crawl your site

Q14. What does it mean when a robots.txt file contains “User-agent: *” and “Disallow: /”?
Ans) Don’t allow any search engines to crawl your site

Q15. You may see a message in your Webmaster Tools Message Center for the following instances:
Ans) All of the above

Q16. If you’re using First Click Free, the page displayed to users who come there from Google search results must be identical to the content that is shown to Googlebot.
Ans) TRUE

Q17. It’s generally a best practice to convey important content on your site with:
Ans) Text

Q18. Duplicate content within your site is unlikely to be problematic if:
Ans) You use the rel=”canonical” link element or the new Webmaster Tools feature called Parameter Handling to ignore specified URL parameters

Q19. You would like your site to be found for some keywords related to your content which are only found in images on the page. How do you do this?
Ans) Use the “alt” attribute or include the keywords in your text

Q20. Your Webmaster Tools account lists a lot of “robots.txt unreachable” errors. What should you do?
Ans) Contact your hoster or server administrator

Q21. Your Webmaster Tools account lists keywords like “viagra” and “ringtones” even though your site is about kittens. What could this mean?
Ans) Your site might be hacked (i.e., spammy comments in your forum, blog posts, etc.) / A hacker could have added those words to your site’s content, or someone could have spammed your blog with comments that include those words

Q22. Your SEO has created ranking reports for your site. The results don’t match what you’re seeing. Why?
Ans) All of the above

Q23. Your site was hacked. What should you do to remedy the situation?
Ans) All of the above

Q24. What’s a good way to submit an XML Sitemap file to Google?
Ans) Use Google Webmaster Tools

Q25. One of your pages is only listed with a title (but no snippet) in the search results. What could the problem be?
Ans) Any of the above

Q26. Your web shop has 100 products and a site: query shows 50,000 URLs indexed. What might this mean?
Ans) Any of the above

Q27. Google guarantees indexing for the following types of sites:
Ans) None of the above

Q28. You have limited bandwidth and would like Google to crawl your site less frequently. What should you do?
Ans) Set a custom crawl rate in Webmaster Tools

Q29. Your server has limited bandwidth resources and you would like Google only to crawl at night. What should you do?
Ans) Have your server respond with HTTP result code 503 to all users when it’s bogged down

Q30. Does the amount of money spent on Google AdWords influence how your site ranks in Google Search?
Ans) No

Q31. One day you read that a free security update–WyszKablamCMS v.2.7.8–has been released. What should you do?
Ans) Read about the update, install it, and address any lingering vulnerabilities or compatibility issues

Q32. One thing Google has found to be true: “Focus on the ______ and all else will follow.”
Ans) user

Q33. Your site is flagged as having malware, but you can’t find the malware. What do you do?
Ans) Post in the Google Webmaster Help Forum to ask for help

Q34. Where do you put your robots.txt?
Ans) The root directory of your domain or subdomain(s)

Q35. “Unreachable robots.txt” in Webmaster Tools crawl errors means:
Ans) We couldn’t reach the robots.txt file on your server

Q36. The number of indexed pages shown in a site: query for your site seems to vary. This could be due to:
Ans) Any of the above

Q37. Your site has 200 pages, but Google only found 5 pages from your site. What could be the cause of this?
Ans) Even when a site is crawlable and indexable, it can take Google time to fully explore it

Q38. You are thinking about putting some links on your site for advertising revenue, which of the below is the correct choice?
Ans) Use the rel=”nofollow” HTML microformat in the “a” tag of the links

Q39. Disallowing via robots.txt prevents Googlebot from “seeing” 301 redirects, meta nofollow, and noindex directives.
Ans) TRUE

Q40. How do you help bots crawl your site more efficiently with If-Modified-Since?
Ans) Respond when appropriate with 304 “Not modified”

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Sunday, September 9, 2012

Measuring SEO Success via Google Analytics

If you've been reading much of what I've written over the years, you'll know that I'm not a fan of using search engine rankings as a measure of success for SEO. Thankfully, we have much better ways to measure SEO success today, thanks to tools like Google Analytics.

While presenting an all-day SEO training class at the University of San Diego last week, I realized that many people who do SEO as part of their job don't always know what information in Google Analytics they should be looking at, nor how to find it. In that spirit, I've put together some of the main metrics that I like to look at when I'm evaluating the SEO progress of a website, as well as how to find or gather those metrics via reports and dashboards. (Please note that Google Analytics is constantly changing and improving; the methods and reports in this article are current as of this writing, but may change at any time in the future.)

The Bare Minimum to Measure to Check on SEO Success

If you do nothing else, you'll want to at least measure the following:
  • Organic keyword traffic
  • Landing pages from organic search
Thankfully, all of the above can be found via Google Analytics' Standard Reporting.

1. Organic Keywords That Bring Traffic

To find these, simply click:

Standard Reporting >
Search > Organic >
Primary Dimension: Keyword



You'll end up with a nice overview of which keyword phrases are bringing direct organic search engine traffic to the website, such as this:




2. Landing Pages That Receive Direct Organic Traffic

To see exactly which pages they landed on, you can click the "Landing Page" link as the Primary Dimension. That will show you something like this:



From there, you can take both of these reports and add them to an SEO Dashboard so that you can quickly glance at this information when you first go into your Google Analytics.

Simply click the Add to Dashboard link near the top of the page and you'll be presented with a box to select which dashboard you want to add it to. (You can have numerous dashboards.)



We'll create a new dashboard and name it "SEO Dashboard."



Check both the Timeline and the Table.



Unfortunately, not quite all the data gets transferred over to your dashboard, but it's still good for quick looks when you don't have time to dig deeper. You'll also want to add the previous keyword report to that dashboard so that you can look at both keyword and landing page information at the same time.



Now our SEO Dashboard provides us with a quick view of which keywords brought organic search engine visitors as well as which pages of the site they first landed on.

But my favorite report of all merges both the keyword data with the landing page data via "Secondary Dimensions."

If you go to your original landing page report and click:

Secondary Dimension > Traffic Sources > Keyword



Then you'll be able to see exactly which keywords brought organic search engine traffic to which specific pages of the site:



Sadly, you can't save any reports with secondary dimensions to a dashboard. However, just last week, Google Analytics introduced a new method to save this sort of report called "Shortcuts." All you have to do is click the new Shortcut link at the top...



Name your shortcut...



...and you're all set! Your saved report will now show up in the left-side bar under a new "Shortcuts" area:



Now every time you want to see the larger report, just click that shortcut link and you'll have the report using whatever time period your Google Analytics is set for when you're viewing it.

Want to email this report to your client or boss? Just click on the email button at the top:



Just fill out whom you want to send it to and choose the format (it can be various spreadsheet formats or a PDF). You can choose to send them automatically on a regular basis (such as each month) or you can just send this particular one once. Be sure to also leave a short message, or Google will provide a prompt for you to do so.



Click Send, and whomever you sent it to will have their copy of the report delivered immediately as an attachment.

I hope this helps you get started with how to measure your SEO success. There is plenty more than what I've told you, but if you are new to Google Analytics and/or SEO, at least you'll have a place to start without getting too confused!

For Continue Reading Click On This Link 

Friday, September 7, 2012

A Brief Guide to Robots.txt and Five Mistakes to Avoid

A Brief Guide to Robots.txt
It’s Guest Post Time!

Irish Wonder explains the origins of the Robots.txt file, why it’s one of the most important SEO documents you’ll ever write, and five mistakes that can damage your site.

What Is a Robots.txt File?

An important, but sometimes overlooked element of onsite optimization is the robots.txt file. This file alone, usually weighing not more than a few bytes, can be responsible for making or breaking your site’s relationship with the search engines.

Robots.txt is often found in your site’s root directory and exists to regulate the bots that crawl your site. This is where you can grant or deny permission to all or some specific search engine robots to access certain pages or your site as a whole. The standard for this file was developed in 1994 and is known as the Robots Exclusion Standard or Robots Exclusion Protocol. Detailed info about the robots.txt protocol can be found at robotstxt.org.

Standard Rules

The “standards” of the Robots Exclusion Standard are pretty loose as there is no official ruling body of this protocol. However, the most widely used robots elements are:

- User-agent (referring to the specific bots the rules apply to)
- Disallow (referring to the site areas the bot specified by the user-agent is not supposed to crawl – sometimes “Allow” is used instead of it or in addition to it, with the opposite meaning)

Often the robots.txt file also mentions the location of the sitemap.

Most existing robots (including those belonging to the main search engines) “understand” the above elements, however not all of them respect them and abide by these rules. Sometimes, certain caveats apply, such as this one mentioned by Google here:

While Google won’t crawl or index the content of pages blocked by robots.txt, we may still index the URLs if we find them on other pages on the web. As a result, the URL of the page and, potentially, other publicly available information such as anchor text in links to the site, or the title from the Open Directory Project (www.dmoz.org), can appear in Google search results.

Interestingly, today Google is showing a new message:

“A description for this result is not available because of this site’s robots.txt – learn more. “